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MONI THE 
GOAT BOY 



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HEIDI 

JOHANNA S PYRI’S 

OTHER CLASSIC STORY OF THE SWISS MOUNTAINS 
ALSO TRANSLATED BY 

ELISABETH P. STORK 

With eight illustrations in color by Maria L. Kirk, 
whose pictures are also one of the special features of 
"Moni the Goat Boy ” and the very popular Stories 
All Children Love Series, of which" HEIDI ” is one. 

Large Octavo. Handsome Cloth binding, 
decorative lining papers, $1.25 net. 

THE CHILDREN’S CLASSICS 

BY JOHANNA SPYRI 
MONI THE GOAT BOY 
BY OUIDA 

THE NURNBERG STOVE 
A DOG OF FLANDERS 

SELECTED 

WONDERLAND STORIES 
BY GEORGE MACDONALD 

THE PRINCESS AND THE GOBLIN 
THE PRINCESS AND CURDIE 
AT THE BACK OF THE NORTH WIND 

Each beautifully illustrated in color 
50 cents net 













































































THE GRANDMOTHER WAS VERY MUCH PUZZLED WHEN MONI CAME HOME WITH 

THE KID ON HIS SHOULDER 


MONI THE * 
GOAT-BOY 

BY 

Johanna spyri 

TRANSLATED BY 

ELISABETH P. STORK 

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY 

CHARLES WHARTON STORK, A.M., Ph.D. 

ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLOR BY 

MARIA L. KIRK 



PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON 
J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 
1916 

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COFYRIC-HT, 1916, BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 
PUBLISHED OCTOBER^ 1916 



PRINTED BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 
AT THE WASHINGTON SQUARE PRESS 
PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 


©C!. A4456S0 

•w© J . 


CONTENTS 


I. Moni is Happy 11 

II. Moni’s Life On the Alp 21 

III. A Visit 35 

IV. Moni Can’t Sing Ant More 49 

V. Moni Can Sing Again 6 
























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ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

The Grandmother Was Vert Much Puzzled when Moni 

Came Home with the Kid on His Shoulder 

Frontispiece 

He Was Just Singing the End op a Song 14 ^ 

Cautiously He Retraced His Steps 32 

That Gave Moni Confidence to Tell the Whole Story . . 60 is 











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PREFACE 

Those children or grown persons who are not 
familiar with Spyri’s classic, “Heidi,” may be 
envied for the pleasure that lies in store for 
them. A more fresh and attractive children’s 
story does not exist. 

In “Moni, the Goat-Boy,” the author is 
again on familiar ground. The elements which 
give charm to the longer book are found once 
more here; the mountains of Switzerland, the 
goats and the picture of a generous and simple- 
hearted hero. The moral is such that no child 
can fail to be impressed by it. Even the older 
person with sufficient imagination to enter into 
the life of a little peasant boy will see that the 
central motive of the tale rings true. As to the 
surroundings, the author is never at fault. 

Charles Wharton Stork 


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MONI THE GOAT-BOY 

CHAPTER I 

MONI IS HAPPY 

If you wish to reach the Fideris Springs Inn, 
you must follow a steep road which leads through 
the long, beautiful valley of Pratiggau. It be- 
comes such a very steep pull for the panting 
horses that most people prefer to get out of the 
coach and climb the green heights on foot. 

First you pass Fideris, a pleasant village situ- 
ated on a green slope. From there you strike 
into the heart of the mountains, till at last the 
lonely building of the Springs Inn is discovered. 

Nothing but fir trees grow on the steep, sheer 
cliffs which surround it on all sides. Thus the 
place might seem gloomy, if the delicate moun- 
tain flowers, with their brilliant colors, did not 
peep out on all sides from the low pastures. 

On a clear summer evening two ladies, after 

leaving the inn, began to pursue the trail that 

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MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


rises not far from the house, till it finally winds 
up to the high towering cliffs. Near the first 
ledge the ladies halted to look at the view which 
met their eye; they had only just arrived in 
this part of the country. 

“It doesn’t seem to be very lively up here, 
Aunty,” said the younger of the ladies, while 
she glanced from right to left and all about her. 
“Nothing but fir-trees and rocks, then behind 
them a mountain with more fir-trees. What 
shall I do all the next six weeks, if nothing excit- 
ing or funny ever will happen?” 

“I shall by no means think it amusing if you 
should lose your diamond cross up here,” the 
other lady replied, while she tied the red velvet 
ribbon on which the cross was fastened. “Now, 
Paula, this is at least the third time since we 
arrived that I have had to tie your ribbon. I 
should like to know if it is the ribbon’s fault or 
yours? I am only certain that you will be 
wretched when it is lost.” 


MONI IS HAPPY 


13 


“Oh, Aunty,” Paula exclaimed with anima- 
tion, “I shall not lose the cross, for I realize 
that it is my grandmother’s heirloom, and my 
greatest treasure.” 

The young girl, to protect the precious cross, 
added two or three tight knots to the ribbon. 
Suddenly, catching a distant sound, she ex- 
claimed, “Listen, Aunty, something lively must 
be coming this way.” 

A merry song, intermixed with a long far- 
sounding yodel, seemed to float down to them 
from far above. The ladies looked up in vain 
to discover the singer. It was impossible to 
see very far up the trail, for it wound down 
through thick bushes and between projecting 
rocks. Suddenly, however, the path became 
animated on all sides with many little feet. 
Soon the song sounded quite near and much 
louder, till Paula suddenly called out: “Oh 
look, look, Aunty; oh look, just look!” 

To her great delight, and before her aunt 


14 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


was aware of it, three or four little goats came 
bounding down, and then more and always 
more; each having a small bell at its neck, which 
tinkled merrily from here and there. Now the 
goat-boy appeared with gay leaps, in the midst 
of his flock. He was just singing the end of a 
song: 

In winter I’m merry 
It’s no use to cry. 

For spring follows after 
He’ll come by and by. 

With a terrific yodel for conclusion, the boy 
and his flock stood quite close by the ladies, 
for with his feet he could leap just as nimbly 
as his little companions. 

“Good evening,” he said, merrily looking at 
the two. He wanted to continue on his way, 
but they detained him, for they were well 
pleased with the boy’s bright eye and face. 

“Stay one moment, and tell me if you are 
the goat-boy from Fideris,” Paula said. “Do 
the goats go up with you from the village?” 



HE WAS JUST SINGING THE END OF A SONG 


















































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MONI IS HAPPY 


15 


“Of course!” was the reply. 

“And do you go up with them every day?” 

“Of course I do.” 

“Well, well now, tell me your name.” 

“Moni” 

“Won't you please sing me the song that 
you were just singing? We have only had the 
chance to hear one verse.” 

“I couldn't, because it is too long,” Moni 
declared. “It will get too late for the goats. 
They must go home.” 

Giving his weather-beaten little hat a push, 
and swinging his rod, he called loudly to the 
goats. They had all begun to nibble at the 
grass, so he shouted to them, “Home now! 
Home!” 

“I hope you will sing it to me another time, 
Moni, won't you?” Paula called after the boy. 

“All right, I shall, and good-night,” he an- 
swered back. Then trotting down with his 
flock he soon reached the inn. At the rear 


16 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


building he halted, for the beautiful white goat 
and the black one with the dainty little kid 
belonged there, and Moni had to deposit them. 
The kid, which was a delicate little creature, he 
always treated with especial care, for* he loved 
it tenderly. All day long the little thing would 
follow him around, it was so much attached 
to him. Putting it gently into its shed, he said: 
“Now, Maggerli, sleep well. You must be 
tired! You really are too little to go so high up. 
Go lie down now in the soft straw.” 

After having put Maggerli to rest in this 
fashion, he quickly strode down the incline in 
front of the inn with his flock. From there a 
road led to the hamlet, and on nearing it the 
boy took up his little horn and blew into it so 
vigorously that you could hear it for miles 
around. At this sign, children from all the 
scattered cottages came running to the spot 
to get their goats, which they could recognize 
from afar. Some women who lived near-by 


MONI IS HAPPY 


17 


would come out of their houses to lead their 
goats home, either by a string or by their horns, 
and in this way the flock was soon dispersed, 
and each little goat provided for. Moni was 
left now by himself, with his own brown goat. 
His home was a little house on the slope, and 
when he approached it, followed by the goat, 
he could see his grandmother already waiting 
for him in the doorway. 

“How have things gone to-day, Moni?” she 
asked him in a very kindly way. Then leading 
the brown goat into the shed, she immediately 
began to milk it. 

Monies grandmother was still vigorous enough 
to do all the work in the house and shed her- 
self, and keep everything neat and tidy. Moni 
stood in the doorway watching the present 
operation. When the milking was done, they 
entered the house. 

“You must be hungry, Moni,” she said. 

“Come and eat.” 

2 


18 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


Everything was prepared for the meal. All 
Moni had to do was to sit down beside his grand- 
mother and eat. Mom's supper consisted only 
of a plate of corn-meal cooked with goat's milk; 
nevertheless he heartily enjoyed it. During the 
meal he would tell his grandmother of all the 
happenings of the day. After he was done, he 
went to bed, to be ready for his early start next 
morning. 

Moni had lived as a goat-boy for two summers 
now. He was so used to the life and so attached 
to his goats that he thought of nothing else. 
He could not remember ever having lived with 
anybody but his grandmother. His mother had 
died when he was little; his father, too, had 
deserted him, having gone to war in Naples. 
His father had hoped to make much money 
there, at least more than at home. Although 
his wife's mother was also poor, she took the 
little lonely boy to her home. Dividing all she 
had with little Solomon seemed to bring her 


MONI IS HAPPY 


19 


luck, for she had never yet had to suffer through 
want. 

Everybody in the village liked brave old 
Elizabeth. When, two years before, a change 
in goat-boys had to be made, all voices unani- 
mously elected Moni. Every one was glad to 
know that Moni could now help his hard-work- 
ing grandmother by earning some pennies. 

When Moni left in the morning, the pious 
woman never let him go without the following 
words: “Moni, be sure not to forget how near 
you are to our dear Lord up on the mountain. 
He can see and hear everything, and nothing 
can be hidden from His eyes. Do not forget 
that He is near you for help. Don’t ever be 
afraid! If there are no people on the pasture 
to call on, just call to the Lord in your need! 
He’ll hear you at once and come to your aid.” 

That had given Moni full confidence from 
the first. He had never been in the least afraid 
of the lonely heights and the steep cliffs, because 


20 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


he always said to himself, “The higher up I 
go, the nearer I am to God. Whatever may 
happen, I shall be safe.” So Moni lived happily 
without care or trouble, and enjoyed himself 
thoroughly from morning till night. To give 
vent to his good spirits, he whistled, sang and 
yodelled constantly all day long. 


CHAPTER II 

MONTS LIFE ON THE ALP 

On the following morning Paula was awakened 
earlier than ever in her life before by a lusty song. 

“I shouldn’t be at all suprised if this were 
the goat-boy,” she said, jumping out of bed 
and running to the window. Just as she had 
guessed, Moni, with fresh, rosy cheeks, stood 
by the open shed. He had just brought out the 
old goat, and now fetched the kid. She saw 
him swinging his staff in the air and leading 
the way forward with his goats, which were 
leaping and jumping about him as they had 
started on their way. Suddenly raising his 
voice again, he sang out loud, while the echo 
resounded from the mountains: 

Up on the fir trees 

The merry birds sing, 

For after a rain-storm 
The sun’s like a king. 


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MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


“He must sing me his whole song to-day,” 
Paula now said, for Moni had already disap- 
peared, and she could not follow the words any 
more. 

Rosy clouds were trailing overhead, while 
Moni’s cheeks were fanned by the morning 
breeze. He loved this delicious cool air when 
he was climbing. In his extreme well-being he 
could not restrain himself from a lively yodel. 
Many sleepers in the hotel opened their eyes in 
astonishment when they were wakened thus. 
Soon, however, they gladly shut them again in 
the happy consciousness that another hour still 
was left for sleep. They were all familiar with 
the voice of the goat-boy who was up and about 
so early. 

Meanwhile Moni with his goats was climbing 
higher up, till after an hour’s time he got near 
to the steepest crags. The further up he went, 
the more beautiful the scene became. Looking 
about him from time to time, he would gaze up 


MONTS LIFE ON THE ALP 


23 


at the sky that was turning a deeper blue every 
minute. Moni began his song now, which 
swelled louder and clearer the higher up he 
went. 

Up in the fir-tree 

The merry birds sing, 

For after a rain-storm 
The sun’s like a king. 

The sun and the stars 
And the moon in the night 
Our dear Lord has fashioned 
To give us delight. 

The joy of the spring flowers 
In yellow and red 
And the joy of the blue sky 
Has gone to my head. 

In summer grow berries, 

I pick them in haste, 

The black ones and red ones 
Are well to my taste. 

In the hedge here are nuts, and 
I know where to find 
Good herbs, for my goats like 
To gnaw the best kind. 


24 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


In winter Fm merry, 

It’s no use to cry. 

For spring follows after 
He’ll come by and by. 

Moni had planned to spend the day in a spot 
where he usually settled down. At last he 
reached the small green field where from a broad 
projecting rock you could look far down on all 
sides into the valley. This prominent rock was 
called the “ Pulpit Rock.” Hour after hour 
Moni could spend there, gazing about him and 
whistling to himself, while his little goats con- 
tentedly grazed on the herbs. 

On his arrival, the boy placed his bag with 
provisions in a hole he had dug for that purpose. 
When this was done, he stepped out on the 
Pulpit Rock and threw himself down on the 
ground, meaning to enjoy life to the full. 

The sky was of the deepest hue. Opposite 
to him the high mountain peaks with their huge 
ice-fields were slowly appearing through the 
morning mist, and below him the green valley 


MONTS LIFE ON THE ALP 


25 


shone in brilliant light. Moni was lying high 
up above the clouds, looking about him, whis- 
tling and singing. The cool mountain breeze 
was cooling his hot cheeks. I am sure that no 
city boy has ever felt such supreme well-being 
as did this simple boy on his hard rock. 

When he stopped whistling for a moment, 
the birds above him merrily took up his song, 
before they flew high up into the sky. Mag- 
gerli came from time to time to rub its head 
against Moni’s shoulder. Full of affection, it 
bleated, and walked around to Moni’s other 
side, tenderly rubbing its soft head on him 
again. The other goats also would take a turn 
to look at their goat-herd and each one had its 
own way of paying the little call. Moni’s own 
brown goat always seemed to come with great 
solicitude, as if she wanted to find out if all was 
well with her owner. Standing before him, she 
gazed at him thoughtfully, till Moni would say: 
“ Everything is all right, Brownie; just go back 


26 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


to your herbs.” There were two that always 
came together. One was a young white goat 
and the other one was called “ Swallow” because 
of her slenderness and agility in running about, 
which could be likened to the bird's swiftness 
in flying into its hole. They used to run to 
Moni with such force that they could easily 
have upset him if the boy had not already been 
stretched out on the ground. With equal swift- 
ness they also took their leave. 

The shining black goat, Maggerli's mother, 
which belonged to the host of the inn, was 
a trifle proud. She did not deem it wise to 
lower herself by coming too confidentially near 
to the boy; she would keep a distance of several 
steps, looking at Moni with lifted head, and 
would then with great dignity resume her own 
pursuits. 

Big Sultan, the billy-goat, regularly appeared 
once a day, and pushing everybody aside he 
happened to meet in Moni's neighborhood, he 
would bleat, full of self-importance, several 


MOOTS LIFE ON THE ALP 


27 


times. He felt himself clearly the leader, and 
as such gave the boy a full account of the state 
of his flock. 

M&ggerli alone could never be driven from 
her protectors side in this fashion; at the arrival 
of the billy-goat it would quickly hide deep 
under Moni’s arm or head, so that it was quite 
impossible for Big Sultan to get near it. Shel- 
tered in that way, it was no more afraid. If it 
happened to encounter the big goat alone, how- 
ever, it generally shook with fear. 

The pleasant sunny morning had gone by, 
Moni had finished his dinner and stood leaning 
on his big staff, which made climbing up and 
down so easy. He was wondering which new 
side of the rocks he should explore this after- 
noon with his goats. At last he decided to try 
the left side, which led to the three picturesque 
Dragon Rocks; in their vicinity the most lus- 
cious bushes grew in abundance, and this made 
the place a veritable paradise for his little charges. 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


The trail was quite steep, and there was 
many a dangerous spot to beware of on the 
abrupt side of the precipice. But he knew a 
good way to get there, and with perfect con- 
fidence in the common-sense of his flock, that 
had never yet gotten lost, he led the way. 
Merrily all the goats followed, sometimes ahead 
and sometimes behind him, Maggerli always 
keeping close to his side. Passing an especially 
dangerous place, he would gently hold and pull 
the little goat along. Everything went well, 
and the whole company arrived on top, safe and 
sound. Leaping away, the goats now attacked 
the green bushes. They recognized the delicate 
food that they had had the privilege of nibbling 
several times before. 

“Take your time; don’t be so wild!” came 
Moni’s warning. “Don’t push each other off 
the sheer rocks, please! It would just take one 
second for one of you to tumble down and break 
your legs. Swallow, look out ! what has come into 


MONTS LIFE ON THE ALP 


29 


your head?” he now shouted up to the rocks 
above him. The swift goat had already climbed 
up as high as the Dragon Rocks, and standing 
on the furthest edge of one, was pertly looking 
down on him. With tremendous swiftness the 
boy climbed up, for it needed only one false 
step for Swallow to drop into the chasm. He 
had reached the dangerous rock in a very few 
minutes. Grabbing Swallow’s leg, he quickly 
pulled her down. “Come with me now, silly 
little beast,” Moni was scolding, while he was 
leading her down to the others. He kept a 
tight hold of her till she had begun to nibble 
eagerly on a bush. He then knew that she had 
given up the thought of running away. 

“Where is Maggerli?” Moni suddenly cried 
out. He only saw the black goat standing 
quietly on a steep precipice not even touching 
the grass. The kid was always either near 
Moni’s side or running after its mother. 

“Where have you left your little kid, black 


30 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


one?” he called out in his fright, while he was 
running over to the goat. She behaved very 
strangely indeed. Not eating or moving from 
the spot, she refused to budge from her position, 
only sometimes she seemed to prick her ears 
suspiciously. Planting himself close to her, 
Moni looked upward and downward. Now he 
could hear a low, plaintive bleat; surely that 
was Maggerli’s voice that came so pitifully 
from far below, calling for help. Moni lay 
down on the ground to lean forward. Yes, 
now he could see something moving below. He 
could see it plainly now! It was Maggerli, 
hanging on a tree branch jutting out from a 
rock. Its bleating seemed to break the boy’s 
heart. It must have fallen down. 

Luckily the branch had caught the kid, other- 
wise it would have died a horrible death by 
falling down the precipice. The danger was by no 
means past, for if it lost hold of the bough, it would 
be hurled into the depths and be dashed to pieces. 


MOOTS LIFE ON THE ALP 


31 


In his extreme anxiety, the boy called down: 
“Hold on tight, Maggerli, don't let go of the 
branch! Wait till I come and fetch you!" 

That was easier said than accomplished. The 
sides of the cliffs were absolutely sheer, and 
Moni knew well enough that nobody could 
climb down from where he was. Then he re- 
membered a rock further below in the same 
altitude as that where the kid was stranded. This 
was an overhanging rock called the Rain-Cliff, 
which gave good shelter in case of rain. All 
goat-boys for years back had spent the rainy 
days under its protection, so the “Rain-Cliff" 
had had its name a long time. 

Moni had decided to get to the kid by start- 
ing from there; then by climbing straight across 
the cliffs he might be able to bring the goat 
safely back. Quickly gathering his flock together 
with a shrill whistle, he descended in a great 
hurry to the entrance of the Rain-Cliff. There 
he left his goats peacefully grazing, while he 


82 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


began his perilous journey. The kid, though 
not so very far away from him, was unfortu- 
nately high above on a branch. It would be 
no easy task to climb up there and back with 
Maggerli on his shoulders. Nevertheless it was 
the only possible way to save the little creature. 

Now he remembered his grandmother's words 
regarding our Lord in Heaven. Assured that 
with God's help he would not fail, he folded 
his hands, praying aloud, “Oh, kind God, help 
me to save poor little Maggerli!" This gave 
him great confidence, and climbing nimbly up 
the side of the rocks, he had soon reached the 
tree. Holding on tight with both feet, he lifted 
the trembling, moaning little kid up to his 
shoulders. Cautiously he retraced his steps, 
and it would be hard to tell you how thankful 
he was when he again stood on the firm ground. 
The joy at seeing the frightened kid safe again 
made him exclaim aloud, “ Oh, kind Lord, a thou- 
sand times I thank thee for Thy help! We are 



CAUTIOUSLY HE RETRACED HIS STEPS 











































MONI’S LIFE ON THE ALP 


S3 


both so glad!” His heart still overflowed with 
gratitude to God in Heaven when he sat on the 
ground with the little kid. He petted and 
stroked the little goat, which was still trem- 
bling in every limb. Moni was trying to con- 
sole it after its bitter fear, and when it was time 
for departure soon afterwards, he again lifted 
Maggerli up to his shoulder. Tenderly he said, 
“Well, my poor dear Maggerli, you are still 
trembling all over! You couldn’t possibly walk 
down to-day. Come, I’ll carry you instead.” 
So the little creature that clung closely to him 
was safely carried down the whole way on that 
eventful afternoon. 

On the nearest incline above the hotel, Paula, 
accompanied by her aunt, was^ already waiting 
for the goat-boy. When she saw Moni coming 
down with his load, Paula asked if the kid was 
sick. Her sympathy seemed so great that Moni, 
sitting down on the ground, told Paula his day’s 
adventure with Maggerli. The young lady’s 

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MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


interest in the matter was very keen. She 
stroked the rescued little creature. How cun- 
ning it looked now, lying peacefully on Monies 
knees, with its little white legs and the glossy 
black coat on its back! It seemed quite will- 
ing to be petted. 

“Please sing me your song now, Moni, since 
you are so well settled here,” said Paula. 

The boy’s heart was so full to-day that he 
gladly began his song. He never paused till he 
had ended. Paula was delighted with his per- 
formance and told him of her hope to hear it 
soon repeated. 

It was time to go now, and before long the 
whole company had reached the hotel. Mag- 
gerli was laid gently down on its couch, and 
saying good-bye, Moni hurried home. 

Paula, returning to her room with her aunt, 
still kept on talking about the goat-boy, whose 
cheerful morning anthem she already longed to 
hear again. 


CHAPTER III 

A VISIT 

Several days passed in this manner, with 
the sun always shining brightly overhead. The 
weather had been particularly fine all summer, 
and not a single cloud seemed to trouble the 
deep blue sky. The goat-boy had passed the 
inn regularly every morning at an early hour 
with a cheerful song on his lips. He returned 
in the same fashion, and had he not done so the 
guests at the inn would have felt cheated, they 
were by this time so accustomed to his songs. 
Paula above all the others delighted in Moni’s 
mirth; nearly every night she came out to greet 
him, for she enjoyed talking to the boy. 

Moni had arrived on the Pulpit Rock on a 

bright, sunny morning, when before throwing 

himself down as usual, he resolved to go further 

up. “ Forward !” he shouted. “Last time we 

were high up you had to leave all the tender 

35 


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MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


little leaves behind you, on account of Maggerli’s 
fall. You can go up to-day to finish your meal.” 

Joyfully the goats climbed after their leader, 
for they knew the way to the Dragon Rocks 
and they well remembered the succulent bushes. 
Moni did not take any chances with Maggerli 
this time; holding it firmly in his arms, he picked 
the leaves from the rocks himself and gave them 
to Maggerli to eat. The little kid seemed glad 
enough to eat out of his hand, and to show its 
gratefulness to Moni it would rub its soft little 
head on the boy’s shoulder from time to time, 
bleating happily the while. 

The whole morning had passed before Moni 
noticed how hungry he was himself. He knew 
that it must be late, but unfortunately he had 
planned to go back to the Pulpit Rock for his 
dinner, so he had left his bag down there in the 
hole. At last he said to the goats, “You have 
had your fill now, while I haven’t even had a 
bite. Come quickly down after me, for I too 


A VISIT 


37 


must have something to eat. There will be 
plenty left for you down below. Come along 
now!” 

When he had given a loud whistle, the whole 
company was up and away. Swallow, followed 
by some other lively goats, leaped down ahead 
on the steep incline. Jumping from rock to rock 
and over many a cleft, she suddenly stopped, 
for an unusual obstacle was standing right 
in her way. It was a chamois, which was curi- 
ously looking at her. Such a thing had never 
happened to the lively goat before! Stand- 
ing stock-still, she looked questioningly at the 
stranger, waiting till it should get out of her way; 
for she wanted to leap to the next rock and pro- 
ceed on her journey. Great was her surprise 
when the chamois, never budging, merely stared 
impertinently at her. 

Standing obstinately right in front of each 
other, they surely would be standing there to 
this day, had not Big Sultan arrived meanwhile. 


38 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


He saw the state of things at once, and care- 
fully passing by Swallow, he gave the chamois 
a push which nearly threw it down the moun- 
tain-side. Only a daring leap saved it. The 
Swallow could proceed triumphantly on her 
way, followed by Sultan, pleased as a king. 
Well satisfied with his deed, he had the proud 
consciousness of being the strong protector of 
his flock. 

While Moni was wandering down, another 
goat-boy was climbing up, always higher, till 
at last the two boys met. First they glanced 
at each other with surprise, but soon their 
astonishment was over, for, being old acquaint- 
ances, they greeted each other cordially. The 
newcomer was Jorgli of Klubis. Half the morn- 
ing he had hunted in vain for Moni. When he 
had nearly given up hope, he had found the boy 
at last, much higher up than he had expected. 

“I never thought you went so high up as 
this with your goats,” said Jorgli. 


A VISIT 


39 


“I don’t always,” Moni replied. “ Generally 
I stay by the Pulpit Rock, or in its neighbor- 
hood. Why have you come up here?” 

“I have come to pay you a call,” was the 
reply, “ because I have a lot to tell you about. 
I have two goats here with me, which I had to 
show to the landlord of the inn. He is going 
to buy one, so I thought I would come up here 
to you, as long as I was so near.” 

“ Are they your goats?” Moni asked. 

“Of course they are ours; I don’t tend the 
strange ones any more because I am no longer 
a goat-boy.” 

Moni was very much surprised at this news. 
Jorgli had been made goat-boy of Klubis at 
the same time Moni had undertaken these 
duties for Fideris. Moni could not understand 
how Jbrgli could give up his position without 
a single murmur. 

The two boys had meantime reached the 
Pulpit Cliff with their flock. Moni, getting 


40 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


his bread, with a little piece of smoked meat, 
invited Jorgli to share the repast. Sitting down, 
they set to and enjoyed their dinner to the full, 
both being blessed with good appetites, besides 
which they had had to wait long for their lunch, 
as it was already late. When all was eaten and 
they had both had some goat’s milk to drink, 
Jorgli stretched himself comfortably at full 
length on the ground, resting his head on both 
elbows. Moni had remained in a sitting post- 
ure, for he loved to look down from his height 
into the valley far below. 

“What are you doing now, Jorgli?” Moni 
began to question his companion. “If you are 
not a goat-boy any longer, you must be doing 
something else.” 

“Surely I am doing something else; some- 
thing very fine too. I am selling eggs now. I 
go with the eggs into all the inns, as far as I 
have time to. I come up to the Fideris Springs 
Inn sometimes; I was there yesterday.” 


A VISIT 


41 


Shaking his head, Moni said, “I certainly 
don’t envy you. I wouldn’t be an egg-boy for 
anything in the world; it is a thousand times 
better to be a goat-boy. Why, it is ever so 
much nicer.” 

“Well, what will you say next, I should like 
to know?” 

“Why, the eggs are not alive! You can’t 
talk to them and they can’t possibly run after 
you the way the goats do. They are never 
pleased when you come to them, and they don’t 
ever get fond of you. The goats, on the con- 
trary, understand every word you say; I don’t 
see how you can have as good a time with your 
eggs as you had with the goats.” 

“Well, I don’t see that you have much fun 
up here,” Jorgli interrupted now. “During 
lunch-time you had to get up at least six times 
to run after that silly kid, and had to keep it 
from tumbling down. Do you call that fun?” 

“Yes, because I like to do it! Don’t I, Mag- 


42 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


gerli? Come, comer Moni had to jump up 
again, because the kid was making perilous leaps 
from sheer enjoyment. 

When Moni had settled down again, Jorgli 
continued: “I know of a good way to keep 
young kids from falling down the rocks with- 
out running after them all the time the way 
you do.” 

“What way do you mean?” asked Moni. 

“Just drive a stick firmly into the ground 
and tie the kid to it by one leg. Of course it 
will kick hard, but it can’t get away.” 

“Well, you may be sure that I will do no 
such thing to my little kid!” Moni exclaimed 
indignantly, drawing Maggerli close to him, as 
if he had to protect it from such outrageous 
treatment. 

“You know of course that you won’t have 
to take care of this little one very much longer,” 
Jorgli said now. “It isn’t coming up here much 
longer.” 


A VISIT 


43 


“What did you say? What? Tell me, Jorgli 
what do you mean?” Moni asked. 

“Pooh, don't you know it yet? The land- 
lord doesn't want to raise it, because it isn't 
over-strong and will never make a healthy goat. 
He has tried to sell it to my father, but my 
father didn't want it either. The landlord is 
going to have it killed next week and after that 
he'll buy our speckled goat.” 

Moni's face had turned white in his fright; 
he could not even utter a word. Suddenly, 
however, he lamented loudly, petting the little 
kid. 

“No, no, they must never do that! Poor 
little Maggerli, they mustn't! I could never 
stand it if they killed you. Oh, I'd much rather 
die with you on the spot. Oh dear, this mustn't 
happen!” 

“Don't go on that way,” Jorgli said, quite 
vexed, while he tried to raise Moni, who had 
fallen flat on his face with grief. “Sit up and 


44 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


forget about it. You know well enough that 
the kid belongs to the landlord, and that he can 
do with it as he pleases. Well, it's over now, 
isn't it? I'll show you something. Look, see!" 
With these words, Jorgli held out one hand. 
With the other one, however, he covered a 
small object which was to furnish Moni dis- 
traction from his sorrow. The object sparkled 
brightly underneath, for the sun's rays shone 
straight upon it. 

“What have you there?" Moni asked, when 
he saw the bright object sparkling in the sun. 

“Guess." 

“A ring?" 

“No, but something like it." 

“Who gave it to you?" 

“Nobody has given it me; I found it." 

“But then it doesn't really belong to you, 
Jorgli." 

' “Why not, I should like to know? I haven't 
taken it from anybody; on the contrary, I 


A VISIT 


45 


nearly stepped on it, and then it would have 
been broken. I can keep it just as if it was mine.” 

“ Where did you find it?” 

“ I found it yesterday evening near the Springs 
Inn.” 

“I am sure that somebody in the house has 
lost it. You must go to the landlord and tell 
him about it. If you don’t, I will do it to-night.” 

“No, please don’t do that, Moni,” Jorgli 
implored. “I’ll show you what I’ll do. I am 
going to sell it to one of the chambermaids in 
the inn, but I won’t give it to her for less than 
four francs. I’ll give you one or two if you 
won’t tell on me. Nobody will ever know any- 
thing about it then.” 

“I won’t take anything. I don’t want the 
money,” Moni interrupted his companion harshly. 
“God has heard every word you have said, 
Jorgli; don’t you know that?” 

Jorgli, after looking doubtfully up to the sky, 
replied: “Well, He is pretty far away!” Moni’s 


46 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


words had made an impression on him, how- 
ever, for he began to whisper. 

“God can hear you just the same,” Moni 
said now full of conviction. 

Jorgli was getting quite uncomfortable under 
those words. He knew that everything was 
lost unless he could bring Moni to his way of 
thinking. After meditating hard for a solution, 
he suddenly said; “Moni, if you won’t tell any- 
body what I found, I’ll make a promise that 
will please you. You don’t have to take any 
money for it, if you don’t want to; then you 
are not in the least responsible. If you want 
me to, I’ll ask my father to buy Maggerli from 
the landlord after all, and I’ll beg him not to 
kill it.” 

These words aroused a terrible struggle in 
Moni. He knew quite well that it was wrong 
to keep the find a secret. When Jorgli had 
opened his hand, he had seen for the first time 
a beautiful cross, set with a great number of 


A VISIT 


47 


stones that sparkled in many colors, Moni 
knew that this was not a worthless thing by 
any means. Probably somebody was looking 
for it. If he kept silence about it, he would be 
just as guilty as if he was keeping it himself. 

On the other hand, Maggerli’s pitiful death 
by the knife rose before his eyes. Darling, 
affectionate M&ggerli! And he could save it 
by his silence. At this very moment Maggerli 
lay trustfully beside him; it always seemed to 
expect his protection, for it was much in need 
of it; he had to do everything to save it, he 
must not let it perish! 

‘Til do it, Jorgli,” he said joylessly at last. 

“Let us shake hands on it,” Jorgli said, now 
holding out his hand to Moni. This was done 
to make the promise absolutely binding. 

Jorgli was glad to have the matter settled 
to his own advantage, and as Moni had not 
said another word he thought U wise to start 
homewards with his two goats, for he lived 


48 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


much further off than Moni. So, after saying 
good-bye, he whistled to his little companions. 
These had been attacked repeatedly by Monies 
goats; they had no party manners and did not 
know that politeness is essential on a visit. 
The two goats from Kiibliser chose the best 
herbs for themselves while they pushed the 
others away; so of course they were properly 
reproved. 

When Jorgli was half-way down the moun- 
tain-side Moni decided to start home with his 
flock. But strangely enough he kept absolute 
silence and all the way did not sing or whistle. 


CHAPTER IV 

MONI CANT SING ANY MORE 
On the following morning Moni approached 
the shed of the inn in the same crest-fallen 
mood. He was still as unhappy as the evening 
before. Without a sound he fetched the land- 
lord's goats and started on his way. Not a 
single note escaped him, no merry yodel clove 
the air; with hanging head he climbed the trail, 
looking most forlorn, and afraid to be seen by 
anybody. From time to time he looked shyly 
around, as if he expected somebody behind him 
to ask him a sudden question. 

Moni could not feel happy any longer but 
he did not in the least know why. After all, 
he had saved Maggerli, and that ought to have 
made him glad. But whenever he tried to sing, 
he found his heart too heavy for the task, his 
voice was gone! Because the sky was covered 
with heavy clouds that day Moni attributed 

4 49 


50 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


his low spirits chiefly to the absence of the sun. 
He firmly believed that his gayety would return 
with its rays. 

As soon as he had reached his destination, it 
began to rain. So, for shelter from the heavy 
down-pour, he sought the Rain-Cliff. The 
goats, following his example, also planted them- 
selves near him under the rocks. The distin- 
guished black goat, to save her lovely shining 
hair, had even crept under the rock before Moni. 
Sitting behind the boy, she happily watched 
the pouring rain from her comfortable corner. 
Maggerli was standing in front of her protector. 
Rubbing her head tenderly on the boy's 
knees, she looked up to him in great surprise, 
for the kid had always heard friendly words 
from Moni, and now he was not uttering a 
single syllable. The brown goat, too, scratched 
with her legs and bleated loudly in her aston- 
ishment at the altered mood of the boy. Moni 
sat thoughtfully leaning on the staff which he 


MONI CANT SING ANY MORE 


51 


always took in rainy weather to prevent him 
from slipping on dangerous places with his 
shoes. He sat there thinking, hour after hour. 

Moni thought over his promise to Jorgli. He 
really felt as if he had stolen something, for 
Jorgli was giving him a reward for his silence. 
He had done a wrong, and he felt in his heart 
that God was angry with him. He was glad 
that the weather was dull and rainy; he could 
hide under the rock instead of having to look 
up at the fair blue sky. He would have been 
more afraid of God if the sun had been shining 
brightly. 

Suddenly a terrible thought entered his mind. 
What would happen if Maggerli should fall 
down over a steep cliff again and God would 
not help him when he tried to save it? He 
would never feel safe any more, if he had to do 
without God's protection. How could he pos- 
sibly pray with a wrong troubling his heart? If 
he should slip and tumble down the pointed 


52 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


cliffs with Maggerli, they would both be dashed 
and torn to pieces. No! he said in his troubled 
heart, such a thing must never happen! Before 
all other things, he would try to pray to God 
and ask to be relieved of the weight that lay 
upon him. Only then could he be glad again. 
This Moni felt distinctly. 

He would go at once and tell the landlord, 
and so throw away the horrible load. But 
what would happen then? Jorgli would never 
persuade his father to buy Maggerli, and the 
little goat was sure to die. No, no! he could 
never bear that. Desperate in his plight, he ex- 
claimed, “No, I won’t do it, I won’t say it!” 

He did not feel any better for this decision, 
however, and the weight on his heart grew con- 
stantly heavier. All day had passed in this 
sad fashion, and when the evening came he 
went silently home as before. 

Paula, as usual, was standing near the inn. 
When she saw Moni coming along, she ran over 


MONI CAN’T SING ANY MORE 


53 


to him and anxiously asked, “Moni, what is 
the matter with you? Why don't you sing any 
more?" 

Shyly turning away, Moni answered, “I 
can't!" and as quickly as possible he took his 
goats and himself out of her sight. 

“If I only knew what has happened to our 
goat-boy! I hardly know him any more, he is 
so changed. I wish he would sing again," Paula 
said to her aunt. 

“Well, I guess it is this horrible rain that 
depresses him," was her aunt's opinion. 

“Oh, everything always happens all at once! 
I wish we could go home, Aunty!" Paula im- 
plored. “All the fun is over here! First I lose 
my cross and can't find it any more, and next 
comes this horrible rain to spoil all the fun. Now 
we can't even hear our merry goat-boy any 
longer. Oh, let us go away from here!" 

“We have to finish the cure, there is no help 
for that," the aunt declared. 


54 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


Next morning it was dull and gray again, 
and the rain still pattered down. Moni spent 
his day under the Rain-Cliff, with the same 
troublesome thoughts coursing continuously 
through his mind. Whenever he decided to 
reveal his wrong and to make peace with God, 
he saw the kid before his eyes, dying painfully 
under the cruel knife. Then his mental strug- 
gles began again, and he would rack his brain 
to find a way out. This brooding all day over 
his trouble and anxiety made him dead tired. 
When he went home in the evening he was so 
occupied with his thoughts that he hardly 
noticed the violent rain. 

The landlord happened to see Moni that 
evening, and when the boy stopped at the shed, 
the man said roughly, “Well, they certainly 
are wet enough. Go in with them ! Why do you 
creep down like a snail now-a-days? I wonder 
what has gotten into you?” 

Moni had never had any but friendly words 
from the man; the landlord liked the cheerful 


MONI CAN’T SING ANY MORE 


55 


goat-boy, and had always given him a friendly 
word. But he did not like Moni's changed 
behavior, and being in quite a state over the 
loss of Paula's cross, which according to the 
lady must have happened in the near vicinity 
of the inn, he was in a mighty poor humor. 
The young lady had assured him that she had 
lost the cross while stepping out of the house 
to hear the home-coming goat-boy's song. The 
landlord was furious when he thought that a 
precious object should be lost in his house and 
not be found again. Only the day before he 
had called together all his servants and having 
examined and threatened them, had ended by 
promising a reward. The whole house seemed 
upset over the loss. 

When Moni passed the front of the house, 
Paula stood there to talk to him, as was her 
custom. Waiting for him there, she had won- 
dered if he would still be silent as on the day 
before and unwilling to sing. When he was 


56 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


quietly walking by her, she said, “Moni, Moni! 
Are you the same goat-boy who used to sing 
so cheerfully all day: 

And the joy of the blue sky 
Has gone to my head ?” 

Moni heard these words, and they made a 
great impression on him, despite his silence. 
Oh, what a terrible change had come! Every- 
thing had seemed so bright and gay before, and 
he had felt like singing all day long. Oh, if he 
could only feel as he had felt then! 

Moni climbed up again to his haunt, next 
day, but his songs had vanished with his spirits. 
The rain had stopped at last; some remaining 
gray clouds obscured the sky, and heavy mists 
everywhere covered the mountains. Sitting 
again under his rock, the boy struggled as before. 
Towards noon, the sky began to get clearer and 
brighter. Coming out of his shelter, Moni 
looked about him. The goats could jump around 
merrily again, and even the little kid seemed 


MONI CAN’T SING ANY MORE 


57 


quite beside itself with joy over the returning 
sunshine. Happily it leaped about. 

Down in the valley and high on the moun- 
tain tops the weather visibly brightened. The 
clouds had parted to let the friendly blue sky 
peep cheerfully down. Moni, who had been 
standing on the Pulpit Rock watching the spec- 
tacle, felt as if God were glancing down on him 
kindly from the beautiful blue sky. At last he 
saw his duty clearly before him. He could not 
bear the weight any more; he had to lay it off. 
Maggerli, the little kid, was just jumping by 
near him, so Moni took it tenderly on his arm 
and said, 

“ Oh, my poor, poor little Maggerli. I have 
done my best for you, but I must not do wrong. 
Oh, if you only did not have to die! Oh, I 
won’t be able to bear it, I know that!” 

The boy burst out crying so bitterly that his 
tears choked him and he could not say another 
word. The little goat, creeping under his arm, 


58 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


bleated most pitifully. It meant to seek safety 
and hide. It was time to go home now, and 
Moni, lifting his pet up to his shoulder, said, 
“Come, Maggerli, IT1 carry you home to-day; 
maybe it is the last time; for I am sure I shan't 
do it very many times more.” 

Paula was lying in wait for the procession 
when it passed by the inn. After the black 
goat and kid were safely deposited in the shed, 
Moni made for the house, passing Paula on his 
way. Generally he went right home, so she 
detained him. 

“No singing yet, Moni? Where are you 
going, and what makes your face look so 
troubled?” 

“I have to tell the landlord something,” Moni 
replied, without raising his eyes. 

“What do you want to tell him? Can't I 
hear about it?” 

“I must see the landlord; I want to tell him 
that something has been found.” 


MONI CAN’T SING ANY MORE 


59 


“What was found? What is it? I have lost 
something too, a very beautiful cross.” 

“Yes, that’s it.” 

“What good news!” exclaimed Paula, greatly 
surprised. “Is it a cross set with sparkling 
stones?” 

“Yes.” 

“Where is it, Moni? Give it to me, Moni! 
Did you find it?” 

“No, but Jorgli of Kiiblis did.” 

Paula wanted to know now who Jorgli was 
and where he lived. She proposed to send some- 
body down to Kiiblis right away to get the cross. 

“I’ll go there quickly myself, and if he has it 
still I’ll bring it up to you,” Moni replied. 

“If he still has it?” Paula said. “Well, why 
shouldn’t he have it any more? How did you 
hear of it all, Moni? Where did he find it? 
Who told you?” 

Moni stared at the ground; he must not tell 
what had passed, and how he had helped to 


60 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


conceal the matter. Paula was very good and 
kind to him, however. She must have divined 
that something had upset the boy. Leading 
him to a tree-trunk, she sat down beside him 
and said, with great kindness: “Come, now, tell 
me how it all happened. I should like to hear 
about it.” 

That gave Moni confidence to tell the whole 
story. He revealed to Paula his terrible anxiety 
for Maggerli and how he had lost all happiness 
because he did not dare to look up to God, and 
how to-day at last he had resolved to clear his 
conscience. 

Paula, in her kindness of heart, talked very 
gently to him. She told him that of course it 
would have been much better if he had revealed 
everything at once. Nevertheless, he had done 
it all purely of his own accord, and so he should 
never repent of his act. Paula informed Moni 
that Jorgli should receive ten francs as soon as 
she was again in possession of the cross. 



THAT GAVE MONI CONFIDENCE TO TELL THE WHOLE STORY 





MONI CANT SING ANY MORE 


61 


“Ten francs!” repeated the boy in astonish- 
ment. He well remembered the price for which 
Jorgli had wanted to part with the treasure. 
Moni, getting up, immediately set out. If he 
went to Kiiblis to-night to get the cross, he 
would be able to take it up with him the next 
morning. At last he could run again and make 
gay leaps! His heart felt light for the weight 
was lifted from it at last. 

On reaching home, he deposited the brown 
goat without much ado. His grandmother was 
informed that he had an errand, and before 
she could ask any questions he was on his way 
to Kiiblis. Jorgli was at home and when he 
heard what Moni had done, he began to get 
angry. He realized, however, that concealment 
was impossible now, as he was known to be the 
finder. Bringing the cross to Moni he asked: 
“Is she going to give me something for it?” 

“Yes she will, but if you had been honest 
from the start, you could have gotten ten francs 


62 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


right away.” Moni said, indignantly. “With 
your lies, you could get no more than four and 
now the lady has promised you ten.” 

Jorgli was mightily surprised, and was also 
sorry that he had not taken the cross to the 
inn immediately after finding it by the door. 
His conscience had been sorely troubled, a dis- 
comfort he might easily have been spared. Alas, 
it was too late to do anything about it now. 

It was already dark, and when Moni had 
received the cross he went home with it in great 
haste. 


CHAPTER V 

MONI CAN SING AGAIN 

Paula had given orders to be awakened early 
next morning; she wanted to be up and dressed 
when the goat-boy passed the house, for she 
intended to talk with him herself. She had 
quite a long conversation with the innkeeper 
that evening, and it had seemed to end to her 
great satisfaction. She must have made a suc- 
cessful bargain with him for she looked very 
cheerful. 

Next morning, when the goat-boy approached 
the inn with his flock, Paula was already stand- 
ing near the house. “Moni, can't you sing 
yet?" she called to him. 

Shaking his head, he replied, “No, I can't 
possibly sing any more. I have to think of poor 
little Maggerli's death all the time. I wonder 
how often I can still take it up with me; I'll 

63 


64 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


never be happy any more as long as I live! 
Here is the cross!” With that, he handed the 
girl a little parcel, for his grandmother had care- 
fully wrapped up the treasure in three or four 
pieces of paper. 

After unwrapping the cross Paula looked at 
it carefully; she saw before her absolutely un- 
harmed, the beautiful sparkling cross she had 
lost. 

“Moni,” she said kindly to her little friend 
“you have made me very happy! Without 
you, I should never have seen my cross again. 
Now I have a little surprise for you, too, as a 
reward. Go and fetch Maggerli from the shed. 
From now on the kid belongs to you!” 

With wide-open astonished eyes the boy 
looked at Paula. He did not seem to compre- 
hend her words, for he stammered: “But, — 
how — how could Maggerli possibly belong to 
me?” 


“Well, I'll tell you how!” Paula said, with 


MONI CAN SING AGAIN 


65 


a beaming face. “I bought it from the inn- 
keeper yesterday, and to-day I am giving it to 
you. Will you be able to sing again now, Moni?” 

“Oh, oh, oh!” Moni exclaimed, while he ran 
like mad to the shed and pulled out the kid to 
take it on his arm. Running back again to 
where Paula stood, he held out his hand to her 
and said over and over again. “Thank you a 
thousand, thousand times! May God reward 
you! I only wish I could do you some favor 
too!” 

“You can do me one by singing your song, 
for I should like to hear how it sounds after all 
these dreary days,” said Paula. 

Moni did not reflect long, but burst out into 
his song and while he was still singing, he started 
to climb the mountain with his goats. His 
jubilant tones rang far down into the valley, 
and there was no one in the inn who did not 
hear the cheerful singer. Many turned on their 

pillows, muttering: 

5 


60 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


“The goat-boy has good weather again.” 

Everybody was glad when they heard his 
merry song, for they had long been accustomed 
to be waked by it daily; some would get up, 
and many would sleep longer. 

When Moni, looking down, could still see 
the young lady standing in front of the house, 
he stepped out near to the edge and sang down, 
as loudly as he could : 

And the joy of the blue sky 
Has gone to my head. 

All day long nothing but peals of joy came 
from Moni’s lips. The goats also caught his 
happiness, and could be seen jumping and leap- 
ing merrily to and fro, as if they were having 
a feast. The sun was shining doubly bright 
from the blue sky after all the recent rain, the 
herbs were particularly fresh and green, the 
little red and yellow flowers sparkled; Moni 
felt as if he had never seen the mountains, the 
valley and the whole world as beautiful as they 


MONI CAN SING AGAIN 


67 


were that day. He was absolutely inseparable 
from his little kid. Picking the best plants for 
Maggerli, he fed it tenderly, while he said over 
and over again, “ Maggerli, my darling! my 
dear little Maggerli, now you won’t have to 
die! You belong to me now, so we can go up 
to the pasture together as long as we live.” 

When he returned at night, his songs could 
be heard for miles around. When he had de- 
posited the black goat in its shed, he took the 
little kid on his arm. It was going home with 
him now, and the kid did not even seem to 
mind leaving its accustomed home; it seemed 
perfectly contented under his protection. Press- 
ing closely against Moni, it showed plainly how 
it loved the boy, who really had treated it with 
much more love and affection than had its own 
mother. 

The grandmother was very much puzzled 
when Moni came home with the kid on his 
shoulder. She could not comprehend what had 


68 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


happened, despite Moni’s shouting to her from 
far, “It belongs to me now, grandmother, it is 
mine!” 

Moni had no time yet to tell her more, for 
busily running to the shed, he prepared a fine 
soft couch of fresh straw for Maggerli. He did 
not want the kid to be afraid of its new abode, 
so he said to it, while he laid it down: “Now 
sleep well in your new home, Maggerli! You 
shall always have a new bed every day.” 

Only when he came back for supper and was 
sitting by his surprised old grandmother did 
Moni tell her the whole tale from the beginning 
of his sad days till the happy ending that had 
taken place to-day. Listening quietly and 
attentively, the grandmother said at last: “As 
long as you live, Moni, you must never forget 
what has happened to you; God had devised 
a way to help you long before you suffered 
for the wrong you did to save your little pet. 
As soon as you acted right and did what pleased 


MONI CAN SING AGAIN 


69 


Him, He was going to find a pleasant way out 
of your difficulty. If you had had confidence 
in Him and kept from doing wrong, everything 
would have come out happily from the start. 
God has really helped you beyond your merits, 
so as long as you live, be sure not to forget it.” 

“No, I certainly shall not,” Moni eagerly 
assented. “I shall always say to myself, ‘My 
only duty is to do what is right before God. 
If I do that He will be sure to fix everything 
just right for me.’ ” 

Before going to bed that night, Moni had to 
run out to the shed once more. Peeping in, he 
saw his little kid sleeping soundly; he could 
hardly yet believe the wonderful truth! There 
was no doubt of it, however, the little kid be- 
longed to him. 

Jorgli received ten francs as Paula had prom- 
ised him. But he did not escape from the mat- 
ter as easily as that. When next he went to 
the Springs Inn, he was led before the innkeeper. 


70 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


Taking the boy by the collar, the angry man 
shook him hard, saying in a menacing tone, 
“Jorgli, Jorgli, better not try again to bring 
my household into discredit! If a thing like 
that happens a second time, you’ll be sent out 
of my house in a way that you won’t like. Do 
you see the willow rod up there? I’ll give you 
a good thrashing with that next time, so look 
out, I tell you. Go and don’t forget my words.” 

There were other consequences to his wicked 
action. If anything at all got lost in the inn 
from that time on, all the servants immediately 
cried out, “No doubt Jorgli from Kiiblis has it!” 

If the boy should chance to come to the house 
at the time, they would crowd around him, 
crying, “Give it to us, Jorgli, let us have it!” 
However much he would protest and assure 
them that he did not have anything and didn’t 
even know what they were looking for, they 
would just shout, “Oh, we know you!” and 
“You can’t fool us.” 


MONI CAN SING AGAIN 


71 


In this way the boy had constantly to suffer 
and had hardly a single moment’s peace. As 
soon as anyone approached him, he was always 
afraid that the person would ask him if he had 
found this or that object. The boy could not 
be happy any more, for he had to think a hun- 
dred times, “If I had only returned the cross 
right away! As long as I live, I shall never 
keep anything that I don’t own.” 

Moni, on the contrary, never stopped sing- 
ing all summer long. He would shout and 
yodel with merriment up there with his goats, 
and no mortal on earth was as happy as he. 
Often, as he was lying full length on the Pulpit 
Rock, looking gaily down into the sunny val- 
ley, he remembered the fearful days when with 
a heavy load on his heart he was sitting under 
the Rain-Cliff, all joy gone from him. Then 
he said to himself, “I won’t let such a thing 
happen again. I shall never do anything that 
will prevent me from cheerfully looking up at 


72 


MONI THE GOAT-BOY 


the sky. I shall never again act against God's 
divine will.” 

Sometimes when Moni, deep in his own 
thoughts, forgot his little charges one or the 
other of these gay companions would approach 
him, full of astonishment at his behavior. Some- 
times they had to bleat quite loudly before they 
at last attracted his attention. Only when his 
Maggerli came and called longingly for his 
company, he would always hear right away. 
Raising himself, he would run joyfully to its 
side, for the tiny, affectionate kid was and 
always remained his dearest treasure. 


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